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      Suggested by DAC.

      The OrbitView requires a lot of configuration to set the view, a lot of which boils down to trial-and-error. This is especially true for configuring the distance of the camera from the origin of the view's coordinate system.

      It should be possible to create an "autosize" feature, similar to XYPlot. OrbitView knows the bounds of the plotted trajectory, so it could zoom itself to fit the entire trajectory within the view, if requested. This feature would be an optional "Autosize" checkbox, separate from the manual camera distance controls.

        Gliffy Diagrams

          Attachments

          1. ex01-after.png
            ex01-after.png
            51 kB
          2. ex01-before.png
            ex01-before.png
            57 kB
          3. ex02-after.png
            ex02-after.png
            76 kB
          4. ex02-before.png
            ex02-before.png
            40 kB
          5. geomview-toolbar.png
            geomview-toolbar.png
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            Activity

            Hide
            rqureshi Rizwan Qureshi added a comment -

            I believe this is a good request! Let's see what CCB decides.

            Show
            rqureshi Rizwan Qureshi added a comment - I believe this is a good request! Let's see what CCB decides.
            Hide
            shughes Steven Hughes added a comment -

            I think a better solution is to let the user configure the viewpoint and zoom using the mouse and then have GMAT retain those settings. A user can probably intuitively use the mouse to configure the viewpoint better than an algorithm we come up with. We just need to allow a "Save User View Point" setup in this case I think.

            Show
            shughes Steven Hughes added a comment - I think a better solution is to let the user configure the viewpoint and zoom using the mouse and then have GMAT retain those settings. A user can probably intuitively use the mouse to configure the viewpoint better than an algorithm we come up with. We just need to allow a "Save User View Point" setup in this case I think.
            Hide
            jjkparker Joel Parker added a comment -

            This is slightly different from the autosize idea, but the easiest improvement here I think would just be to display the ViewPointVector on the OrbitView (like we do with the coordinate system & epoch). Then the user at least has an idea what order of magnitude the numbers are.

            Show
            jjkparker Joel Parker added a comment - This is slightly different from the autosize idea, but the easiest improvement here I think would just be to display the ViewPointVector on the OrbitView (like we do with the coordinate system & epoch). Then the user at least has an idea what order of magnitude the numbers are.
            Hide
            marchand Belinda Marchand added a comment - - edited

            I think it would still be beneficial to have an autosize feature in some form. I thought including some examples might be helpful but I can't seem to attach files. I have some pictures to show you, based on Geomview's interface. I'll email those to Joel since I can't post them here.

            Show
            marchand Belinda Marchand added a comment - - edited I think it would still be beneficial to have an autosize feature in some form. I thought including some examples might be helpful but I can't seem to attach files. I have some pictures to show you, based on Geomview's interface. I'll email those to Joel since I can't post them here.
            Hide
            marchand Belinda Marchand added a comment -

            OK, I can attach files... just not directly through the comments interface window. Anyway, as I was suggesting, I’ve used Geomview for years for scientific visualization of complex surfaces. It’s an open source package, runs on linux or cygwin. Anyway, here’s an example of what I mean.

            Geomview’s viewer has a toolbox menu (see attached snapshot). Some of the buttons below allow you to put the mouse in a specific mode (rotate, translate, scale, fly, zoom, or orbit). The “Look” and “Center” buttons describe the capability I suggested in some sense, though they each do something different.

            “Look” essentially translates the view so that the camera is looking directly at the object dead center. Think about the sight on a weapon, for example, the target is still at the same distance, but you’ve just centered it on your sight. ex02-before.png and ex02-after.png show an example of its application.

            “Center” literally takes the object, wherever it may be (even if completely out of view) and (a) re-centers it, (b) rescales the view to fit the objects within it and (c) re-orients the view to match some default (xy, xz, or yz, for example). ex01-before.png and ex01-after.png show an example of its application.

            Hope that helps.

            Show
            marchand Belinda Marchand added a comment - OK, I can attach files... just not directly through the comments interface window. Anyway, as I was suggesting, I’ve used Geomview for years for scientific visualization of complex surfaces. It’s an open source package, runs on linux or cygwin. Anyway, here’s an example of what I mean. Geomview’s viewer has a toolbox menu (see attached snapshot). Some of the buttons below allow you to put the mouse in a specific mode (rotate, translate, scale, fly, zoom, or orbit). The “Look” and “Center” buttons describe the capability I suggested in some sense, though they each do something different. “Look” essentially translates the view so that the camera is looking directly at the object dead center. Think about the sight on a weapon, for example, the target is still at the same distance, but you’ve just centered it on your sight. ex02-before.png and ex02-after.png show an example of its application. “Center” literally takes the object, wherever it may be (even if completely out of view) and (a) re-centers it, (b) rescales the view to fit the objects within it and (c) re-orients the view to match some default (xy, xz, or yz, for example). ex01-before.png and ex01-after.png show an example of its application. Hope that helps.

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